Category Archives: Grannum one name study

My genes update

This is an update on my earlier blog on my DNA tests. Since the blog was written in 2014 four other Grannums have undertaken DNA tests and we all have close paternal matches – in addition three of them match as genetic cousins. Because of the genetic evidence suggesting that were possibly related within about 5 generations we used personal and online indexes and linked documentary evidence to join two previously unknown family groups, rewrite the family tree for one family and take both families back several generations to the 1840s. The testers have joined the FamilyTreeDNA Grannum project at https://www.familytreedna.com/groups/grannum/about
ydna-from-ftdna

Paternal DNA markers – the highlighted sections indicate differences. The red are faster changing STR markers

From: https://www.familytreedna.com/public/grannum?iframe=yresults

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Searching for William Granham

All family historians will hit a brickwall where they can’t find more information on a person. My brickwall is William Crannum who was resident in Barbados in 1735 but I don’t why he was in Barbados, how he got there or where he came from.

The earliest record I have found is the baptism of Andrew to William and Ann Granham on 13 June 1742 in St Thomas parish church, Barbados; they were resident of St James’

Baptism of Andrew Granham, 13 June 1742

13 June 1742, Andrew the son of William and Ann Granham ???h of St James Parish & baptiz’d in St Thomas Church. Barbados archives, RL1/49 p23.

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grannum (gră’nŭm | græ’nʌm)

noun, plural grannums

informal: grandmother, old woman

origin: 18th century variation of grandam

Definition of Grannum From Entick'sNew Spelling Dictionary

Entick’s “New Spelling Dictionary” (1787)

  • Grey as grannum’s cat (693) (Thomas Fuller, Gnomologia: Adagies and Proverbs; Wise Sentences and Witty Sayings, Ancient and Modern, Foreign and British, 1732)
  • Teach your grannum to spin (4321) (Fuller, 1732)
  • Teach your grannum to such eggs (4322) (Fuller, 1732)
  • Teach your grannum (grandame) to suck eggs – a reproof to those, who think they have more knowledge than the whole world, and will be ever and anon teaching those who have had more Experience than themselves. (Nathan Bailey, George Gordon, Philip Miller, Thomas Lediard, Dictionarium Britannicum: Or, A More Compleat Universal Etymological English Dictionary Than Extant, 1736)
  • Go and teach your grannum to crack filberts (Thomas George Smollett, The Adventures of Sir Lancelot Greaves, 1762)
  • Grannum or Grandam – an old grandmother (Entick’s New Spelling Dictionary: Teaching to Write and Pronounce the English Tongue with Ease and Propriety. New edition by William Crakelt, 1787, p 170)
  • Grannum’s gold – hoarded money: supposed to have belonged to the grandmother of the possessor (Francis Grose, Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, 1811)

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Grannum one name study

[This was copied from my Guild of One Name studies profile page on 8 March 2014]

About the Grannum one-name study

I started researching my own family in 1987 and thought that with such an unusual name that this would not be difficult!

Flight Lieutenant Clifton Winnington Grannum in Sudan 1936
Flight Lieutenant Clifton Winnington Grannum in the Sudan 1936

At the time I could not find much information before the birth of my grandfather. However, because Grannum, and its variants, is extremely

uncommon I decided to extract all entries I could find. I registered the name with the Guild of One-Name Studies in early 1988.

Origin of the surname

From my research I believe that the name originated in Barbados in the 18th century. Indeed, all the Grannums I have been in contact with have come from the Caribbean and in particular Barbados.

There were Granhams and Garnhams in Barbados in the 17th and early 18th centuries but these were isolated individuals and do not seem to have been related or to have left descendants in the islands. The surname Grannum can be shown to have been in continuous use in Barbados since the 1780s.

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